Tipperary Town main street

About Tipperary Ireland

County Tipperary, the largest Ireland inland county, covers and area of 1,647 square miles of some the most picturesque and fertile countryside in Ireland. Scattered with an abundance of important archaeological sites, this historical county is famed for its rich heritage and culture. Fondly famed for its stories and songs, County Tipperary is full of charm and a warmth visitors will not forget.

In 1838, the county was divided by Government into two administrative areas – the North Riding and South Riding which are still managed as separate entities. Combined, the population of County Tipperary stands in excess of 130,000. The county name is derived from the Irish ‘Tiobraid Arann’, the well of Era, referring to the River Ara.

The center of County Tipperary is known as ‘the Golden Vale’, a rich pastoral stretch of land in the basin of the River Suir, which crosses the county from north to south. Tipperary is bound by mountains to the south and west with a border on Lough Derg in the north thus offering a superb range of outdoor activities for locals and visitors alike. The primary historical site is that of the Rock of Cashel, an imposing Cathedral and round tower encompassing some 2000 years of history, was once an important ecclesiastical center and home to the Kings of Munster.

County Tipperary has a strong sporting history and is home to the Gaelic Games of Hurling, Gaelic Football, Camogie, and Handball.

Principle towns in County Tipperary

The capital town of North Riding is Nenagh and the South Riding capital is Clonmel.

Other significant townships are Tipperary, Cahir, Carrick-on-Suir, Cashel, Roscrea, Templemore and Thurles.

A brief history:

Tipperary is situated in the south of Ireland and extends from the border of Galway nearly to the south coast. Tipperary is the largest inland county in the country and is a very picturesque region, with the stunning Galtee Mountains, the River Suir and a rich, lush, green landscape, famous for its horse studs.

Tipperary is better known as the Premier County, dating from the 1840s when Thomas Davis in the Nation newspaper lauded Tipperary for it’s nationalistic feeling and claimed ‘Where Tipperary leads, Ireland follows.’

Key attractions:

The Rock of Cashel is one of the most famous of Tipperary’s landmarks with a group of mediaeval buildings sitting on top of a rocky outcrop dominating the skyline of the town of Cashel. Cashel is where Ireland’s most famous King, Brian Boru the last High King of Ireland, was crowned.

Lough Derg is the largest of the lakes along the river Shannon, the longest river in Ireland, and is almost an inland sea. It is well known for game and coarse angling, boating, windsurfing, sailing, and water skiing. The lake itself has many islands, the most famous of which is Inis Cealtra – Holy Island, which is the site of a 7th century monastic settlement. Lough Derg is the largest of the lakes along the river Shannon, the longest river in Ireland, and is almost an inland sea. The lake itself has many islands, the most famous of which is Inis Cealtra – Holy Island, which is the site of a 7th century monastic settlement.

 

County Tipperary Ireland, the largest inland county, covers and area of 1,647 square miles of some the most picturesque and fertile countryside in Ireland. Fondly famed for its stories and songs, County Tipperary is full of charm and a warmth visitors will not forget.

Combined, the population of County Tipperary stands in excess of 130,000. The center of County Tipperary is known as ‘the Golden Vale’, a rich pastoral stretch of land in the basin of the River Suir, which crosses the county from north to south.

If you are visiting County Tipperary then Ballyhoura Luxury Hostel is the ideal accommodation for you, family, traveling international Groups. We are located on the borders of Tipperary, Cork & Limerick so there is lots of opportunities to explore some of Irelands best counties

Visit Blarney Castle & Kiss the Blarney Stone Limerick

History of Blarney Castle

The Blarney Castle is known around the world for it’s famous Blarney stone, a stone that you kiss to at the top of the castle to get the gift of the gab. But, the castle has so much more than just the stone to offer. It is knee-deep in history and rich in culture, certainly a place you must visit in Ireland.

The castle was built almost 600 years ago in the small village of Blarney in County Cork, and since then millions of people from all over the world have come to visit it. It is one of Ireland’s most loved and treasured landmarks.  It is said that once you kiss the stone at the top of the tower you will never be lost for words again, it is said that.

The exact origin of the Blarney stone is debatable; some say it was brought to Ireland by the prophet Jeremiah, and used as a fatal stone or a stone of destiny to forecast Kings of Ireland. Others say it came from Scotland after a battle, and some say it came from the Crusades. Wherever it came from, there is a mutual belief amongst all that by kissing the stone you receive the gift of eloquence.

As the famous stone, the Castle has beautiful, and magical, gardens that you can walk around no matter the season. In the summer it is the rose beds that are blooming, in the fall the trees are the most spectacular view and in the winter there is a lovely mysterious beauty around the gardens, particularly in the lake and woodland areas.

The Blarney Castle Gardens

The castle you see today is actually the third castle that was built here. The first castle was made from wood and the second made from stone. In the 15th century the third castle, which is the one we see today, was built by the King of Munster, Dermot McCarthy.

The property was sold in the 17th to Sir James St. John Jefferyes who was the Governor of Cork at the time. At the beginning of the 18th century his son, by the same name, built a Georgian gothic house near the castle and laid out a fantastic landscape garden. This is known as the Rock Close, which you can visit at the grounds. It is a stunning arrangement of massive boulders and rocks, around what is believed to be druid remains from pre-historic times.

To really soak up the remarkable and brilliant history of this castle you must walk and visit around it. And don’t forget to kiss the stone! We promise it won’t disappoint.

The Blarney Castle is known around the world for it’s famous Blarney stone, a stone that you kiss to at the top of the castle to get the gift of the gab. The castle has so much more than just the stone to offer. The castle was built almost 600 years ago in the small village of Blarney in County Cork, and since then millions of people from all over the world have come to visit it. The castle you see today is actually the third castle that was built here. The first castle was made from wood and the second made from stone.

The castle originally dates from before 1200, when a timber house was believed to have been built on the site, although no evidence remains of this. Around 1210 this was replaced by a stone fortification.

The castle was besieged during the Irish Confederate Wars and was seized in 1646 by Parliamentarian forces under Lord Broghill. However, after the Restoration, the castle was restored to Donough MacCarty, who was made 1st Earl of Clancarty.

During the Williamite War in Ireland in the 1690s, the then 4th Earl of Clancarty (also named Donough MacCarty) was captured and his lands (including Blarney Castle) were confiscated by the Williamites.

The castle was sold and changed hands a number of times– Sir Richard Pyne, the Lord Chief Justice of Ireland, owned it briefly– before being purchased in the early 1700s by Sir James St John Jefferyes, then governor of Cork City. The castle was sold and changed hands a number of times– Sir Richard Pyne, the Lord Chief Justice of Ireland, owned it briefly– before being purchased in the early 1700s by Sir James St John Jefferyes, then governor of Cork City.

Members of the Jefferyes family would later build a mansion near the keep. This house was destroyed by fire, and in 1874 a replacement baronial mansion, known as Blarney House, was built overlooking the nearby lake.

Kissing the Blarney Stone

In the mid 19th century, the Jefferyes and Colthurst families were joined by marriage, and the Colthurst family still occupy the demesne. In May 2008, the present estate owner, Sir Charles St John Colthurst, Baronet, succeeded in a court action to eject a man who had lived on his land for 44 years. The man’s great-grandfather had been the first to occupy the estate cottage.

The castle originally dates from before 1200, when a timber house was believed to have been built on the site, although no evidence remains of this. The castle was besieged during the Irish Confederate Wars and was seized in 1646 by Parliamentarian forces under Lord Broghill. After the Restoration, the castle was restored to Donough MacCarty, who was made 1st Earl of Clancarty. The castle was sold and changed hands a number of times– Sir Richard Pyne, the Lord Chief Justice of Ireland, owned it briefly– before being purchased in the early 1700s by Sir James St John Jefferyes, then governor of Cork City. Members of the Jefferyes family would later build a mansion near the keep.

Visit Blarney Castle & Kissing the Blarney Stone to experience a great Irish treasure. Ballyhoura Luxury Hostel is located on the boarder of Cork and a great location to Stay. Contact us today to get information about Hostel and make a booking to stay.

About Limerick County

Limerick is one of the major cities of Ireland, located in Munster province in the south of the country. Limerick is a compact old town known for the medieval-era. Limerick is a place full of surprises! Ireland’s third largest city but also a friendly and welcoming destination; a cultural hotbed and National City of Culture in 2014.

Limerick has a pace and dynamism you’ll find almost nowhere else in Ireland. Situated on the majestic River Shannon, Limerick City is a vibrant hub of education, economic recreational and social activity in Ireland’s Mid-West region.

Limerick is commonly referred to as ‘Ireland’s Sporting Capital’; and while we are the economic core of Ireland’s Mid-West, we are also widely known for our warmth and home-town feel.

Few regions offer the magical blend of City and County quite like Limerick. Famed for the friendliness of its people and with a whole host of superb accommodation options, family fun festivals, cultural events and exciting arts and attractions, Limerick has something for everyone to enjoy!

In the city centre the medieval glories of King’s Island sit comfortably alongside modern pedestrian plazas lined with colourful boutiques, upmarket hotels, legendary pubs and nightclubs and award-winning restaurants and cafes. The City’s environs are also home to some fantastic sights including: neolithic Lough Gur, Ballyhoura Country, Foynes, the birthplace of the Irish Coffee and Adare, whose medieval churches and thatched cottages make it Ireland’s prettiest village.

Limerick is home to an eclectic cultural scene and was designated the first ever National City of Culture in 2014. Limerick is also synonymous with sport, with the “spiritual home” of Munster Rugby, Thomond Park Stadium, just outside of the city centre. Gaelic football, hurling, golf, cycling, rowing and horse-racing are also particularly popular pursuits in Limerick. Limerick is extremely proud to have been awarded the prestigious title of European City of Sports 2011.

Limerick is a cosmopolitan and sophisticated city but it has often been said that perhaps Limerick’s biggest attraction of all is the people themselves who are warm, witty and welcoming!

Fun Facts about Limerick to learn more visit https://www.limerick.ie

  1. The University of Limerick has the longest footbridge in Ireland and one of the longest footbridges in Europe – it is called the Living Bridge!
  2. King John’s Castle is the westernmost Norman castle in Europe!
  3. In 1651 after Cromwell’s forces captured the City, St. Mary’s Cathedral was used as a stable for the army’s horses!
  4. Some of Limerick’s well-known sons and daughters include actor Richard Harris, rock legends The Cranberries, broadcaster Terry Wogan, novelist and playwright Kate O’Brien and Pulitzer Prize-winning author Frank McCourt! (The above photo is of Terry Wogan in Limerick in 1974)
  5. Limerick is known as the Treaty City after the Treaty of Limerick was signed here in October 1691!
  6. Irish Coffee, a brew infused with Irish whiskey, was invented in Limerick village Foynes in 1943!
  7. There are 10 places in the USA called Limerick: Limerick, Georgia, Limerick, Illinois, Limerick, Louisville, Limerick, Maine, Limerick, Mississippi, Limerick, New York, Limerick, Ohio, Limerick, South Carolina, Limerick Township, Pennsylvania, and New Limerick, Maine!
  8. Former US President, John F. Kennedy’s great-grandfather, Thomas Fitzgerald (the man who gave them the ‘F’ in their name), hails from the town of Bruff in east Co. Limerick!
  9. Limerick is home to the largest Georgian Quarter in Ireland outside Dublin!
  10. Limerick, Ireland’s third largest city, was founded by the Vikings in 812. Limerick is one of Ireland’s oldest cities, with a Charter of Incorporation older than that of London’s, dating back to 1197!

If you are look of a Luxury, Friendly warm Stay while you are visiting Limerick, Why not book your stay at Ballyhoura Hostel.

About Ballyhoura Mountains


The Ballyhoura Mountains span across south-east Limerick and north-east Cork. The area of mountains situated in Cork is mainly afforested with commercial conifers, while large areas within Limerick’s borders consist of blanket bog and heathland. The landscape is in general very rich in wildlife and geology.

Patchwork areas of blanket bog, dry and wet heath occur across the Seefin and Coolfree Mountains of the Ballyhoura range. A variety of mosses and heathers dominate the wet heath vegetation as well as bilberry bushes. The interspersed areas of dry heath are characterised by Bell Heather, Tormentil, and different varieties of sedges such as Green-ribbed Sedge. The remaining blanket bog areas support vegetation typical of the habitat, for example Common Bog Cotton, Deergrass and heather. Also of significance is the area of the rare and protected Killarney Fern found on the slopes of Carrigeenamrontrty Hill at the outer edges of the Ballyhoura Mountain Range.

The diverse habitats of the Ballyhoura Mountains, including the afforested areas within Cork’s borders, provide an important nesting ground for a variety of birds. Hen harriers and Peregrines are of particular interest in the area as they are both listed on the EU Birds Directive. The heath areas are ideal, and vital, foraging ground for the Hen Harriers.

The Ballyhoura Mountains are also home to the largest designated single bike trails in Ireland at 98km. The area also hosts the annual Ballyhoura International Walking Festival in May.

The Ballyhoura Mountains are a great way to experience the beautiful landscape Ireland has to offer. Come and stay at Ballyhoura Luxury Hostel to enjoy this fantastic Irish Gem

Hotels Combined ‘Recognition Of Excellence’ 2017

Hotels Combined Recognition of Excellence 2017

Hotels Combined Recognition of Excellence 2017

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Hostel Photos

Here are some photos of Ballyhoura Hostel, the bedrooms and common areas.

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Aquapark

Ireland’s newest Aquapark has just opened 40 minutes from Ballyhoura Hostel. at Ballyhass Aquapark. We are thrilled about this really exciting addition to Ballyhass Lakes, which already offers wake boarding, zipling, kayaking, leap of faith and many more! Now you can jump, slide, bounce, climb & race your friends around this amazing course. Book your tickets online now with prices at €15 for U18 and €20 for adults www.ballyhassaquapark.ie
So if you’re planning a team building event, a hen/stag, or a fun weekend away with your friends/family, call us now on 063-91625 to book our luxury accommodation so close to this brilliant activity cen

Aquapark

Aquapark

tre Ballyhass Aquapark & Adventure Activities

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Accommodation for HearSay 2017

HearSay International Audio Arts Festival takes place from the 29th of September to the 1st of October. We are now fully booked out on the Friday and Saturday of the festival but we do have availability either side of those dates. Three days and nights of sound, story and sharing taking over the mountain village of Kilfinane in Co. Limerick, Ireland. Your ideal accommodation for HearSay 2017, we are located in the village of Kilfinane, with all the venues and pubs just a stroll up the street. Call Séamus now on 00353-63-91625 or email seamusnunan@gmail.com to book your place with us.

Limerick Fleadh 2017- Kilfinane

Through the great work that Ballyhoura CCE have been doing over the last couple of years and the support of the town, the Limerick Fleadh 2017 is coming to Kilfinane.  It will be a wonderful June Bank Holiday full of traditional Irish music in the pubs, street ceili’s and entertainment, aswell as competitors hoping to get through to the next round!

We are delighted to offer 2 night’s luxury accommodation for €55 per person sharing, or 3 night’s for €75. For those looking for a one night stay, our spacious 14 bed dorm is available for €28 per night. There are private and family rooms available. This promises to be a fantastic weekend of music, dancing and craic. So please contact us directly on 063-91625 or seamusnunan@gmail.com  

Ballyhoura Hostel is located in this magical mountain village, all the events and entertainment are just a stroll up the street. You can park your car up for the weekend in our secure off street car park and fully enjoy yourself without the hassle or expense of taxis. So just park up and enjoy what promises to be a wonderful weekend of craic agus ceoil. 

More information on the event is available on Facebook.com/cceballyhoura or email fleadhluimnigh@gmail.com

Here's where the craic will be

Here’s where the craic will be

GAISCE GROUP

The Gaisce ‘season’ is upon us and we are enjoying having school groups here, who are going for the Bronze Gaisce President’s award. There are four key challenge areas which include Community Involvement, Personal Skill, Physical Recreation and an Adventure Journey. That’s where we come in, on the Adventure Journey part. The students stay with us and over the course of a couple of days, they walk and hike many kilometers through the Ballyhoura Mountains.  It’s tough but very enjoyIMG-20160412-WA0002able and it’s a real opportunity for team building. Here’s our most recent gang, before they catch their bus back home after a great experience. Well done everyone!!